Shop the
USHistorySite Store


DONATE


US History Site blog


History to 1783
Native Americans
Columbus' Voyage
Exploration & Discovery
Jamestown
Salem Witch Trials
Original 13 Colonies
Thomas Jefferson
Ben Franklin
US Revolution
War for Independence
Signers of the Declaration

1781 - 1850
Drafting/Ratifying the Constitution
Federalist Papers
Launching a New Nation
George Washington
War of 1812
Andrew Jackson
Reform Movements
Underground Railroad

1825-1877
Westward Expansion
Oregon Trail
Mexican American War
Slavery/Politics/Division
Civil War
Lincoln
Gettysburg Address
Reconstruction

1876 - 1917
Industrialization
Immigration/Urbanization

1890-1920
Teddy Roosevelt
Imperialism
The First World War
Woodrow Wilson/Peace

1920-1940
Isolationism
The Roaring 20s
Harlem Renaissance
Great Depression
The New Deal
FDR

1931-1960
World War II
The Holocaust
Korean War
Harry Truman

1954-1975
The Turbulent 1960s
Kennedy and the Cold War
Martin Luther King
Vietnam Era


1968-Present

Nixon/Watergate
Gerald Ford
Reaganomics

Trusted writing service A-Writer

Our Global History
A World History Blog


AMERICAN HISTORY
TIMELINES


PICTURES IN
AMERICAN HISTORY


GAMES/ TOYS


WEBQUESTS

TESTS AND QUIZZES

PRESIDENTIAL
QUOTES


HOMEWORK HELP

FAMOUS AMERICAN
QUOTES


TOP 100 SPEECHES

MAPS

PRIMARY
DOCUMENTS

BASEBALL HISTORY

HISTORY LINKS

AMERICAN POLITICS

TEACHER'S
RESOURCES


SITE MAP


Sites for teachers

history top 100 websites

Teacher web sites

Join the USHistorySite group on Facebook


Andrew Jackson Biography

Lesson Plans | Quotes| Facts


7th President of the United States
In office - March 4, 1829 – March 4, 1837

Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was elected and re-elected in landslide victories and many believed he should have won the Election of 1824. He was also the first sitting President to be physically attacked and the first upon whom assassination was attempted. Such were the contradictions of the man: Jackson came from a humble background and stood up for the rights of common folk, yet he was a rich planter who owned large numbers of slaves. He became a national hero for defeating the British in the Battle of New Orleans, yet his long resume in the field of “Indian removal” has reflected poorly on him. Indeed, Jackson continues to polarize historians today just as he polarized the people of his time.

Jackson was born in the Waxhaws, a region on the North Carolina-South Carolina border. At 13, he was a courier for a local militia in the Revolutionary War. After admission to the bar in 1787, he moved to future Tennessee; Jackson became a US Representative when Tennessee became a state in 1796 and represented Tennessee in the Senate from 1797-98 and 1823-25. In the military, he achieved the rank of Major General and his victory in the Battle of New Orleans was of immense symbolic importance. But he also played key roles in military campaigns against Native Americans, foreshadowing the aggressive and controversial “Indian removal” policies of his presidency.

With only the Democratic-Republican Party intact, the Election of 1824 came down to a regional battle. Though Jackson had a plurality of electoral votes, none of the four candidates had the required majority, so the House of Representatives had to decide among the top three. Speaker of the House Henry Clay, who had placed fourth, supported John Quincy Adams. Adams won and made Clay his Secretary of State, leading Jackson’s supporters to charge that a “corrupt bargain” had decided the election. Adams never recovered and Jackson handily defeated him in 1828.

Jackson’s divisive effect was such that it created a new party landscape: the Democratic Party supported Jackson while the National Republican and Anti-Masonic parties opposed him (the latter two were succeeded by the Whig Party). As President, Jackson bit the hand of the system which put him into office: “I have heretofore recommended amendments of the Federal Constitution giving the election of President and Vice-President to the people and limiting the service of the former to a single term. So important do I consider these changes in our fundamental law that I cannot, in accordance with my sense of duty, omit to press them upon the consideration of a new Congress.” He also worked against lifelong appointments to political offices, promoting the “spoils system” in which offices were awarded to, and rotated among, party supporters.

Jackson dismantled the Second Bank of the United States, for which the Senate censured him. Another economic matter threatened the very integrity of the Union. The Nullification Crisis erupted when South Carolina asserted the right to nullify federal-level tariffs. By extension, South Carolina was claiming the right of a state to nullify a federal law, period, which Jackson denounced as “incompatible with the existence of the Union, contradicted expressly by the letter of the Constitution, unauthorized by its spirit, inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded, and destructive of the great object for which it was formed.” The crisis was eventually settled (with Henry Clay’s help), but Vice President John C. Calhoun cost himself his job by supporting South Carolina, his home state, and was replaced by Martin Van Buren – Jackson’s eventual successor.

 

Are you worried about Pass4sure ccda certification books besides exam Pass4sure OG0-091 study guide preparation? We offer up-to-date exam Pass4sure 70-290 exam dumps and Testking 70-667 training paper with 100% exam pass guarantee of Pass4sure 1Y0-A05 practice test guide.

Andrew Jackson biography

12th Amendment
The Age of Jackson
The Papers of Andrew Jackson