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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers were written and published during the years 1787 and 1788 in several New York State newspapers to persuade New York voters to ratify the proposed constitution.

In total, the Federalist Papers consist of 85 essays outlining how this new government would operate and why this type of government was the best choice for the United States of America. All of the essays were signed "PUBLIUS" and the actual authors of some are under dispute, but the general consensus is that Alexander Hamilton wrote 52, James Madison wrote 28, and John Jay contributed the remaining five.

Lesson Plans | Primary Sources |

 

Lesson Plans:

A Guide for Government Activity - What follows are quotations from several essays in The Federalist Papers. After each selection are two kinds of activities. The first activity includes questions that should be discussed and answered by the whole class or in small groups. If necessary, refer to a dictionary or your government textbook. The second activity after each selection is intended as an individual or homework assignment.


Before and Beyond the Constitution. What should a president do? - students look at the role of President as defined in the Constitution and consider the precedent-setting accomplishments of George Washington.


Primary Source Documents:

Federalist Papers Index - The Federalist Papers remain today as an excellent reference for anyone who wants to understand the U.S. Constitution.



United States Constitution - The members of the Constitutional Convention signed the United States Constitution on September 17, 1787 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Constitutional Convention convened in response to dissatisfaction with the Articles of Confederation and the need for a strong centralized government. After four months of secret debate and many compromises, the proposed Constitution was submitted to the states for approval. Although the vote was close in some states, the Constitution was eventually ratified and the new Federal government came into existence in 1789. The Constitution established the U.S. government as it exists today.

 

 

 


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federlist papers resources

James Madison
Madison's Struggle for the Bill of Rights
John Jay
Alexander Hamilton