Shop the
USHistorySite Store


DONATE


US History Site blog


History to 1783
Native Americans
Columbus' Voyage
Exploration & Discovery
Jamestown
Salem Witch Trials
Original 13 Colonies
Thomas Jefferson
Ben Franklin
US Revolution
War for Independence
Signers of the Declaration

1781 - 1850
Drafting/Ratifying the Constitution
Federalist Papers
Launching a New Nation
George Washington
War of 1812
Andrew Jackson
Reform Movements
Underground Railroad

1825-1877
Westward Expansion
Oregon Trail
Mexican American War
Slavery/Politics/Division
Civil War
Lincoln
Gettysburg Address
Reconstruction

1876 - 1917
Industrialization
Immigration/Urbanization

1890-1920
Teddy Roosevelt
Imperialism
The First World War
Woodrow Wilson/Peace

1920-1940
Isolationism
The Roaring 20s
Harlem Renaissance
Great Depression
The New Deal
FDR

1931-1960
World War II
The Holocaust
Korean War
Harry Truman

1954-1975
The Turbulent 1960s
Kennedy and the Cold War
Martin Luther King
Vietnam Era


1968-Present

Nixon/Watergate
Gerald Ford
Reaganomics


Our Global History
A World History Blog


AMERICAN HISTORY
TIMELINES


PICTURES IN
AMERICAN HISTORY


GAMES/ TOYS


WEBQUESTS

TESTS AND QUIZZES

PRESIDENTIAL
QUOTES


HOMEWORK HELP

FAMOUS AMERICAN
QUOTES


TOP 100 SPEECHES

MAPS

PRIMARY
DOCUMENTS

BASEBALL HISTORY

HISTORY LINKS

AMERICAN POLITICS

TEACHER'S
RESOURCES


SITE MAP


Sites for teachers

history top 100 websites

Teacher web sites

Join the USHistorySite group on Facebook


Reconstruction

Lesson Plans | Primary Sources |

 

Lesson Plans:

The Southern "Black Codes" of 1865-1866 - The end of the Civil War marked the end of slavery for 4 million black Southerners. But the war also left them landless and with little money to support themselves. White Southerners, seeking to control the freedmen (former slaves), devised special state law codes. Many Northerners saw these codes as blatant attempts to restore slavery.

The Battle Over Reconstruction
This curriculum unit of three lessons examines the social, political and economic conditions of the southern states in the aftermath of the Civil War and shows how these factors helped to shape the Reconstruction debate as well as the subsequent history of American race relations.


The Role of President Lincoln in Reconstruction 1863-65: A Simulation Activity - This lesson focuses on Lincoln’s role as president during the Civil War. After reading a variety of primary sources written by Lincoln or to him, students analyze under what provisions of the Constitution he acted as president. They then try to imagine what a week in the life of the President might have been like by writing a diary as Lincoln or his secretary.<more>

After Reconstruction: Problems of African Americans
in the South
- When Reconstruction ended in 1877, African Americans in the South faced many of the problems they had faced since Emancipation. Some of these problems were getting worse, and new problems were gaining importance.Brainstorm a list of new and intensifying problems African Americans in the South faced after Reconstruction <more>


Primary Source Documents:


Report of the Joint Comittee on Reconstruction
- text from a congressional proposal concerning reconstruction.

Andrew Johnson Veto of the First Reconstruction Act, March 2, 1867 - text from Andrew Johnson's veto of the Reconstruction Act of 1867.

Cut down your exam stress by using our latest exam Testking 640-816 certification material and 646-364 Certification dumps high quality study material. We provide updated exam JN0-101 exam dumps with 100% pass guarantee along with exam Testking 640-553 exam product and Testking 70-648 certification study guide.

civil war lesson plans documents battles lessons high school

Andrew Johnson
Civil War